AN ACCURATE MAP OF NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA WITH THEIR INDIAN FRONTIERS SHEWING IN A DIFFERENT MANNER ALL THE MOUNTAINS, RIVERS SWAMPS, MARSHES, BAYS, CREEKS, HARBOURS, SANDBANKS AND SOUNDING ON THE COASTS; WITH THE ROADS AND INDIAN PATHS;...AS WELL AS THE BOUNDARY OR PROVINCIAL LINES, THE SEVERAL TOWNSHIPS AND OTHER DIVISIONS OF THE LAND IN BOTH THE PROVINCES; THE WHOLE FROM ACTUAL SURVEYS.

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Henry Mouzon


An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina with their Indian Frontiers Shewing in a different Manner all the Mountains, Rivers Swamps, Marshes, Bays, Creeks, Harbours, Sandbanks and Sounding on the Coasts; with the Roads and Indian Paths;...as well as the Boundary or Provincial Lines, the several townships and other divisions of the land in Both the Provinces; the whole from actual surveys.

Copper plate engraving, 1775-1794.
Four sheet map joined and segmented, Each section measures 21 x 29 1/8” (53.3 x 74.2). Overall 42 x 58 1/4" (106.7 x 148 cm).
Overall in good to very good condition. Original outline color..
LOCATION: New York City

Inventory Number: 280
Price: $17,500.00
Publisher : Published by Laurie & Whittle. 53, Fleet Street. 12th May 1794.
A fine segmented case or “saddlebag” map of the rare third state of Mouzon’s important map of the Carolinas.

Third state of three.

Published just five weeks after the Battle of Lexington and Concord, Mouzon’s map is the best for the Carolinas of the period of the American Revolution. It was used by both sides as a reference for strategic planning. George Washington apparently owned two examples, now at Yale and the American Geographical Society; General Rochambeau’s example is at the Library of Congress; and Sir Henry Clinton’s example is at the Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

This map was normally found in two sheets and folded into Thomas Jefferys “American Atlas”, London 1775. As it was oversized, almost all of the bound examples suffered damage to the right hand margin. A few examples were sold separately; in this case all four sheets have been joined, segmented into sixty four segments and mounted onto linen and cut into four quarters. Retains two period marble paper slip cases, each holding two sections. The slip cases made it so that it could be folded down to a much smaller size, (each slip case measures 7 1/2 x 5 1/2”). This was done so that travelers could easily take it with them. One of Washington’s copies (American Geographical Society) was also dissected and linen-backed.

Mouzon’s large-scale map was the most comprehensive and detailed that had yet appeared for the two colonies; it was the first to extend far enough to the west to include all three of their topographical regions: the Tidewater, the Piedmont, as well as the Back country. It included all of their “mountains, rivers, swamps, marshes, bays, creeks, harbors, sand banks, and soundings along the coast; with the roads, Indian paths; as well as the boundary or provincial lines. In a detailed re-analysis of William P. Cumming’s research, Jay Lester has concluded the Henry Mouzon, given first credit in the title cartouche, probably contributed very little to the overall topography. Lester concludes that the map was more likely complied by Louis Delarochette, a London cartographer, using a combination of pre-existing manuscript and printed sources.

Two period slip cases, each with manuscript title, North & South Carolina East and the North & South Carolina West. Rare and unusual variant edition and in an unusual format.
Maps