A MAP OF THE NEW ENGLAND STATES MAINE NEW HAMPSHIRE VERMONT MASSACHUSETTS RHODE ISLAND CONNECTICUT WITH THE ADJOINING PARTS OF NEW YORK & LOWER CANADA.

image41571

Nathan Hale

Artist's Biography

A Map of the New England States Maine New Hampshire Vermont Massachusetts Rhode Island Connecticut With the adjoining parts of New York & Lower Canada.

Engraving, 1826 (1849).
44 5/8 x 37 1/2" plus narrow margins.
Overall in very good condition.
LOCATION: New York City

Inventory Number: 41571
Price: SOLD
Publisher :
This little known and rather scarce map is in fact, a most important production, the first significant large-scale map of New England issued in the 19th century. As such, it is best viewed as the successor to Thomas Jefferys and Braddock Mead’s Map of the Most Inhabited Part of New England (1755). Hale’s map is extremely informative, particularly regarding the geography of the area. It delineates state, county and township boundaries; major topographical features; and significant cultural and economic resources such as canals, roads, colleges, churches and manufacturing centers. The political information appears to be relatively up to date; in Massachusetts, for example, one finds Hanson (est. 1820); North Bridgewater, now known as Brockton (est. 1821); and East Bridgewater (est. 1823). Hale’s sources are somewhat vague, but an ad in the September 11, 1826 Boston Commercial Gazette makes clear that he (or a silent associate) was primarily a compiler, working from existing sources rather than engaging in original surveys: “compiled from a careful comparison of all the published maps and charts, and all the surveys, drawings, and other documents which would aid the undertaking, known to the compiler, in the public offices, or in the hands of individuals, and from personal examinations of many parts of the country” Hale likely based this map on important official state maps published in the 1790s-1810s—Whitelaw’s map of Vermont (1796 and later), Osgood Carleton’s maps of Maine and Massachusetts (1798 and later), Warren and Gillette’s of Connecticut (1811), and Carrigain’s of New Hampshire (1816). Nathan Hale (1784-1863) was a Boston polymath, with a career spanning the teaching of mathematics, private law practice, journalism (as founder of the Daily Advertiser), book publisher and civil engineer. He also helped establish the Boston and Worcester Rail Road and was its first President from 1831 to 1849. His father Enoch Hale was a brother of the famous martyred patriot. Nathan’s mother was Octavia Throop, so there is likely a family connection with J. V. N. Throop, the Boston engraver who produced the present map. Hale is little-known as a mapmaker, and there are no other known cartographic productions by him. This example is from the 1849 issue of the map. “Corrected by the addition of the Railroads, new towns, & other public improvements, to March, 1849.” The inset map is of the “Northern & Eastern Part of Maine and part of Lower Canada and New Brunswick.” This inset maps delineates the boundary line according to the treaty of 1842. A scarce map in any state. Maps